Kayak Rack for Jeep Cherokee

Best Kayak Roof Racks of 2018

In Gear by Tanner V.

The Best Kayak Roof Racks


 Editor's Choice

Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle

Loaded with Features



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Premium Pick

Yakima Showdown

Full Lift/Load Assist



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Best for Multiple Kayaks

Inno Dual Kayak Stacker

Additional Safety Features



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Value Pick

ROLA J-Style

Premium Components



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About the Author
Hi Everyone! My name is Tanner, and I am the founder of kayamping.net. I started this website as an outlet to pursue my hobby of kayaking, camping, and exploring the world at large. Every post here is written and curated by me so stop-in, have a read, leave a comment, and most importantly, get going on your next adventure!

All you want to do is get your kayak in the water and begin paddling, but how do you get it there? Unless you have a truck, you are going to need trailer or roof rack to transport your kayaks. There are hundreds of roof racks on the market but only a few that can be considered the best. Don't worry we did the leg work by reviewing 30+ roof racks to find you the top racks with the most features for the best price. No longer will you have to rely on that borrowing that one friend's truck to have an enjoyable weekend on the water.

This massive 10,000 word guide details all the most popular kayak roof racks and some hidden gems we unearthed during our research process. That being said, you may need a bit of a road map to hop to the section that best suits your needs. The racks are categorized by order of complexity. The most complicated kayak racks are lift assistant racks, which use mechanical advantage to help get the kayak from the ground to your car roof. Next are load assistant racks, which assist with getting the elevated kayak from your hands to the rooftop carriers. Finally, we detail permanent roof racks with minimal to no load/lift assist and conclude with temporary roof racks.

If you don't have time to digest all this information, check the next section "Compare the Best" to our top picks. For those who think a kayak trailer may better suit their needs, check this related article The Malone Kayak Trailer Buyer's Guide.

Compare the Best

Preview
Whispbar WB401 Saddle Roller Kayak Carrier - Rooftop Kayak Boat Rack
Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle Kayak Carrier - Rooftop Kayak Boat Rack
INNO INA446 Surf-Wind-Long Board Locking Roof Carrier w/Board Pads - Holds (1) Kayak or (1) Canoe or (2) SUP/Wind/Surf-Boards
Product Name
Whispbar WB401 Saddle Roller Kayak Carrier - Rooftop Kayak Boat Rack
Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle Kayak Carrier - Rooftop Kayak Boat Rack
INNO INA446 Surf-Wind-Long Board Locking Roof Carrier w/Board Pads - Holds (1) Kayak or (1) Canoe or (2) SUP/Wind/Surf-Boards
Rating
Price
$129.99
Price not available
$215.99
Crossbar Compatibility
Whispbar Crossbars Only
Whispbar Crossbars Only
Universal except round bars require adapter
Lift Assistance
Load Assistance
Dual Kayak Capability
Preview
Whispbar WB401 Saddle Roller Kayak Carrier - Rooftop Kayak Boat Rack
Product Name
Whispbar WB401 Saddle Roller Kayak Carrier - Rooftop Kayak Boat Rack
Rating
Price
$129.99
Crossbar Compatibility
Whispbar Crossbars Only
Lift Assistance
Load Assistance
Dual Kayak Capability
Preview
Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle Kayak Carrier - Rooftop Kayak Boat Rack
Product Name
Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle Kayak Carrier - Rooftop Kayak Boat Rack
Rating
Price
Price not available
Crossbar Compatibility
Whispbar Crossbars Only
Lift Assistance
Load Assistance
Dual Kayak Capability
Preview
INNO INA446 Surf-Wind-Long Board Locking Roof Carrier w/Board Pads - Holds (1) Kayak or (1) Canoe or (2) SUP/Wind/Surf-Boards
Product Name
INNO INA446 Surf-Wind-Long Board Locking Roof Carrier w/Board Pads - Holds (1) Kayak or (1) Canoe or (2) SUP/Wind/Surf-Boards
Rating
Price
$215.99
Crossbar Compatibility
Universal except round bars require adapter
Lift Assistance
Load Assistance
Dual Kayak Capability

Premium Pick

Yakima Showdown

  • 45% lift assistance
  • Waist level loading
  • Foldable J-style carriers

    The Yakima Showdown represents the best value of all kayak racks because it offers best in class features without fluff. It is simple, sleek, and effective without all the extra glitter and glamour used by manufacturers to beef up the price.

    Simple lift assistance shown in the Showdown will not remove any of the lifts, but contains features to ease the entire process. The J-style carriers slide down the side of the vehicle for side loading. This allows the loader to fully secure the kayak to the carriers at more ergonomic chest height as opposed to once the kayaks are already on the roof. Once the kayak is secured to the carriers, you simply push the kayak up onto the roof. The Showdown tracks on two rails that reduce weight of the kayak by 45%. Since the rails guide the kayak, it removes balancing act allowing the loader to focus solely on pushing.

    The Yakima Showdown uses J-style carrier to hold the kayaks in place during transit. These carriers can be folded down when not in use. Sounds pretty standard, right? Wrong. A feature that seems so obvious that all kayak car racks should include them, but they still somehow do not. Folding carriers reduces the overall height of the vehicle to just above roof level, which means you can keep the rack on your car year round. One less step to worry about when planning your next trip.

    The primary focus of this review is on kayak car racks, but it should be mentioned that the Yakima Showdown is compatible with up to two stand up paddle boards. It is always nice to have a cards up your sleeve for a sunny day.


    Editor's Choice

    Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle

    • Sleek Design
    See on Amazon
    • Sliding lift assisting arms
    • Foldable vertical arms
    • Anti-theft lock and key

        Whispbar strikes again with a wonderfully designed and impressively sleek Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle. I love the look of Whispbar products, and this J-cradle is not exception. This unit features a foldable upright arm, which locks at both the upright and down positions. A focal point of foldable arms is always the folding joint because it is a big point of failure on some other systems. The 10 lb solid construction eliminated doubts of the folding joint not being sturdy enough to handle heavy loads.

        All Whispbars features QuickDock technology, which allows the user to quickly attach the cradles to the crossbars without any tools. We are talking under one minute installation so easy it is hard to justify leaving them on overnight. However if you do, a built-in locking feature will ensure there is no chance of theft.

        My favorite feature is the extendable load assist arms. These stick about two feet out from the side of the rack to assist the loader getting the kayak to appropriate height and angle to fit into the J-cradles.
        I am very impressed with the design and utility of this J-cradle. Whispbar created a feature packed J-cradle without detriment to its appearance or functionality. It may be pricey, but its value outweighs the cost in my eyes.


        Best for Multiple Kayaks

        INNO Dual Kayak Stacker

        • Innovative crossbar cradles
        • Large pad – prevents oil canning
        • Dual Kayak Capability
        • Round crossbar require adapter

          Inno bounces on the scene with my favorite kayak stacker system on the market, the INNO INA450 Easy Mount Dual Kayak Carrier. Why you may ask? It is simple. This rack comes at a reasonable price, has no fatal flaws, and makes loading a stacker easy! That’s right, this stacker comes with two sets of clamp on cradles to hold the kayak up while you strap it in. The fix we all needed from stackers is upon us.
          Now back to the basics, this model is foldable with a high strength metal joint. In fact, the majority of the stacker is metal with a thick pad wrapped around the contact area.

          The INA450 is “universal” with all crossbars claims Inno. Lawyers were used in this description because it is universal only if you purchases the round bar adapters, which are sold separately. Square bars and most factory bars are in the clear though.

          Other than the round crossbar conundrum, this is the best stacker on the market in my opinion. However, if you do not trust Inno, a smart alternative could be to buy one of the stackers from the Group (Thule/Rhino/Yakima) and purchase the Inno cradles to go along with them. This is out of my price range personally, but it would be a winning combination.


          Best for the Money

          ROLA

          • Value Pick
            See on Amazon
            • Sturdy construction
            • Fuel efficient J-Style transportation
            • Straps need improvement

              ROLA hit the hammer on the nail with the ROLA 59912 J Style Kayak Carrier. It is in the sweet spot of price and value for J style carriers. Thule, Yakima, and Malone all make a product similar to this model, but at a much steeper price tag with minimal value add. The ROLA is sturdy and well made, with no concerns of longevity issues. Really the only thing I can find wrong are the lack luster straps. The bow/stern tie-downs are fine, but the straps that hold the kayak to the J carriers are not usable for most people. I recommend purchasing some after market straps like these DORSAL Tie Down Straps.


              How to Choose Kayak Racks


              Types of Base Roofs

              Bare Roof - Your vehicles has no roof rack system on it and is only a roof panel. You have options if this where you find yourself. There are solutions that require no roof rails or crossbars such as foam blocks or inflatables. These are some of the cheapest options, but require the most work and open you up to the most risk. Otherwise, you will need to install roof rails and crossbars before selecting a kayak roof rack.
              Roof Rails - These beams run the length of your roof panel from rear window to windshield. They serve as the foundation for crossbar attachment and create space between the roof and load. I recommend choosing a vehicle in this situation if possible because installation usually requires help from a professional. Roof rails need crossbars added before they can properly carry a kayak.
              Crossbars - These beams run perpendicular to the roof rails and from right door to left door. Carriers, which actually hold the kayak, are attached to cross bars. Roof rails and crossbars work together to provide the necessary structure to support kayak roof rack transportation. If you are in this situation, you are ready to move on to the next step.

              Vehicle Height

              The height of your vehicle compared to your own height will impact, which kayak roof racks are best for you. If you have ever worked with your hands above your head, you realize it doesn’t take long for shoulders to start aching. You will want a system that allows you to work at a comfortable height or prepare to purchase a Step Ladder. Certain types of kayak racks are best for different vehicles types.

              Physical Capability

              An NFL player and an accountant typically have different physical capabilities and their choice in kayak rack should reflect that fact. Based on the intended vehicle of use, be honest if it is feasible to hoist and strap in a kayak. There are a plethora of helpful tools available from fully mechanized lifting systems to more subtle lean-to options. There are solutions for every kind of person. Loading a kayak is always harder after a long day on the water. It is wise to plan with this in mind.

              Weight and Dimensions of Your Kayak

              Google the make and model of your kayak. Unless you have an ancient or custom kayak the information should be readily available online. For the majority of kayaks weight will be somewhere between 30-80 lbs, which will work for most rigs. However, fishing kayaks and tandems are becoming increasingly heavy and will only work with certain car racks. Know this information upfront so you can make a good decision!

              Number of Kayaks and People

              Some kayak racks can hold multiple kayaks while others hold only a single. Additionally, lift assist solutions are less necessary if there are two people capable of loading. Know what kind of trips you will be going on and prepare appropriately.

              Understanding your Situation

              At the end of the day, you want a kayak rack that has two key elements: safety and protection.
              You want a rack that will allow you to load your kayak on to the roof of the vehicle without slipping a disk and that will secure the kayak to the vehicle during transportation. The height of your vehicle and your physical attributes are things to consider here. You will be required to both lift the kayak and strap it into its carrier system so be honest with your capabilities over the life of the carrier. Have a strong idea of your typical kayamping adventure before you make a buying decision so you can get what you need.

              Types of Kayak Roof Racks

              Now that you understand your needs, lets get to the fun stuff. Kayak roof racks can be placed into different categories. No category is better than another, but each has their own strengths and weakness.

              Lift Assistance

              Lift assistance uses some mechanical advantage to reduce the weight of the kayak or amplify human strengthen during loading or unloading. These are the most sophisticated and comprehensive solutions to easily getting the kayak onto your roof.

              Load Assistance

              You might think I am splitting hairs here with lift vs. load assistance, but there are legitimate differences. These will help you to put the kayak onto the roof of the vehicle by leaning or rolling the kayak. Typically used in conjunction with permanent carriers.

              Carriers

              Carriers are what physically hold the kayak and attach to the crossbars. They offer no lift assistance and have the sole purpose of keeping the kayak on the roof of your vehicle. There are two main types of carriers permanent and temporary.
                  Permanent are metal carriers with foam padding that can be easily installed and left on the vehicle for long periods of time.
                  Temporary carriers are made from foam or plastics, which will deteriorate if left on the vehicle for extended periods of time.

              Lift Assistance Kayak Roof Racks


              Kayak roof rack with lift assistance are the premium option for above vehicle transporting. With the often hefty price tag associated with them, you would expect there to be real value for the customer. Buyers prefer this type because it enables them to get to water and enjoy their kayak. Lifting 50-80lbs over your head is a young mans game, not practical for the vast majority of yakers. This option is best for individuals, who see unloading and loading the kayak as a impediment to the experience.

              1. Yakima Showdown

              • 45% lift assistance
              • Waist level loading
              • Foldable J-Style
              • Uses entire roof – allows for only one kayak per car

              This product was highlighted in our Best of the Best section. See the top of the article for the full write up.

              2. Rhino Rack Nautic Kayak Lifter

              Product Image 600X300px
              • Complete Lift and Load Assistance
              • 176lbs. Load Capacity
              • Setup/Breakdown Time Required

              TL;DR: The engineers at Rhino created a superb product and the sales team knows it. As long as you are within your budget, this is the best full lift assistance kayak rack on the market. The rack provides the most utility with the least strain on the loader.

              Let’s go to first principles when talking about full fift assistance for kayak racks. Full assistance means the kayak will lift itself onto the roof without any work from the loader. While this is what it should mean, there are currently no true full lift assistant kayak racks on the market. However, the Nautical Kayak Lifter (NKL) by Rhino is as close as it gets because it removes all lifting of the kayak.

              The NKL is the only product on the market that uses a crank and slope system to move the kayak from the ground to the roof, and it really works. The crank and pulley amplify the operators movements, allowing the use of a single arm to hoist a kayak up to 80kgs (176lbs)! Not only is this the most efficient loading and unloading system in the market, but it can hoist the heaviest kayaks. Competing full assistance kayak racks top out at 40kgs (80lbs).

              Now you might say, this can’t all be good. What am I going to do with the large rails that the kayaks uses to slide onto the roof? Rhino designed an answer for this too. The two rails can be clipped next to the kayak on the roof rack for storage during transit. Poof! The rails are no longer a nuisance.

              Remember the long rails are part of the reason the NKL is absolute genius. Since the rails run from the ground to the roof, the kayak does not need to be physically lifted and placed onto a carrier. The NKL is the only kayak rack that removes this back-breaking lift.

              The NKL offers the best design and most flexibility when it comes to kayak racks. Rhino felt the price tag must also be a category leader so this is one of the most expensive racks on the market. Keep in mind, more features costs more money, but a kayak rack is fractions of what slipped disk surgery costs.

              3. Thule Hullavator Pro

              • Hydraulic Lift Assist
              • Side Loading Capability
              • Hefty Price Tag
              • Uses entire roof – allows for only one kayak per car

              TL;DR: The Thule Hullavator Pro represents a pioneering effort to mechanize the kayak loading process. While this is promising for the future of the industry, the concept still needs some maturation. The gas assisted lift system makes kayaking accessible for solo trips and those with lifting impairments, but the system critically ignores the ground to carrier lift, which begs the question - If you can lift it to chest height, do you really need the lift assist?

              The Thule (pronounced Toolie) brand is one of the most well known and respected manufacturers in the car accessory business. The industry giant is at again with the innovative Thule 898 Hullavator Pro. This is the latest edition of the Hullavator series; the only kayak car rack with gas struts.

              The Hullavator Pro changes the kayak loading game because it is the first to implement a mechanical solution to hoisting the kayaks up to the roof of the vehicle. This brings a sense of automation to the loading process, which offers consumers a peek into Thule’s future vision of car accessories. Currently, there are not perfect solutions to the act of getting kayaks onto the roof of the cars causing barriers to the watersport.

              The Hullavator Pro’s 40 lbs. of lift assistance is praised by those with lifting impairments because it makes solo kayaking accessible to the elderly, disabled, or petite. However, the lifting process is not completely removed. When loading/unloading a kayak, there are essentially three key pain points: kayak to carriers, kayak loading to the car roof, and strapping the kayak to the rack for transport. The Hullavator offers solutions to strapping in the kayak (side loading) and getting the kayak to the roof (gas strut assistance), but ignores the kayak from ground to carrier. This main differences is why the Rhino NKL received the first spot in the full assistance category.

              Critics of the Hullavator claim if you can get the kayak to the side load position, then there are other far cheaper solutions for you. As a person with a strong back and decent height, this argument is all it took for me to not consider the Hullavator for my own use.

              The second chief complaint is the price point. The Hullavator is one of the most expensive units on the market because it is quite frankly the most elaborate. Thule products are known for their quality so premium parts combined with manufacturing of gas struts has elevated the price point too far for many customers. Others argue the cost is validated by the reduction in doctor’s office visits, which should be taken into consideration.

              The compatibility of the Thule roof rack is questionable. Their website claims the Hullavator can support kayaks up to 36’ wide, but many users find the 34’ is the maximum. Anything beyond 34’ is susceptible to oil canning or indentions in the hull, which can impact tracking.
              The Hullavator is a fickle beast and will only work with Thule-made racks. Other brands and factory issued stock bars will not work.

              4. The StrongArm

              • Lift assist up to 145 lbs.
              • Good for 11+ ft. kayaks
              • Requires trailer hitch

              TL;DR: The StrongArm attaches to the trailer hitch and serves as a lever to lift the kayak onto the roof rack. It looks to be a gimmick, but the system is very useful for larger kayaks. The price tag is on the low end but you must also consider the cost of carriers when evaluating it for yourself.

              To be honest, I thought this lift assistance was a major gimmick that presented more opportunity for injury than anything else. However, upon further investigation, this is an innovative solution for heavier kayaks. The StrongArm Kayak Loader attaches to your trailer hitch and uses a spring loaded arm to lever the kayak onto the roof of your vehicle.
              The StrongArm is capable of lifting kayaks up to 145lbs, and is best suited for longer kayaks 11+ feet. The only other lift assist with this type of capability is the Rhino Nautical Kayak Loader so if you need a heavy weight system, it is best to compare these two.
               
              The StrongArm is best used in conjunction with horizontal carriers or so you can easily push and pull the kayak from the top of the vehicle. J-style carriers in particular should be avoided for this reason.
              The unit can be removed or kept on the vehicle after use. The start-up and tear down time is minimal.

              5. Malone Telos Kayak Load Assist Module


              • Suction cup design can damage vehicle
              • Kayak doesn’t fall into carrier easily

              TL;DR: Overall the problems with this rack system are too great to overlook. For the majority of people, the damage to your vehicle and difficult of pushing the kayak into the carriers will cause more problems than it is worth. In general, the design needs to be improved and consumers should look elsewhere for the time being.

              Malone brings a unique approach to the lift assistance by being the only lift assist that uses a ratchet system. The Malone Telos Kayak Load Assist Module are two extendable arms that attach to Malone’s J-style carrier, the Malone Downloader. This is a side load system so the kayak must be hoisted to chest height and placed onto the Telos. The load is placed on the Telos then ratched up, teeter-totter style, a few inches at a time. The Telos ends at about roof level, then the loader is required to push the kayak up the onto the Downloaders. The Telos must then be unattached and stored during transport.

              You may have noticed I ranked this system last and for good reason. There are a few negatives to this system that cannot be ignored. The system does work, but I think the main draw is the price tag. This system appears to be a great value if it worked as intended. I happen to disagree.

              First, the Telos has suction cups at the end of the arms that rest against the door panel during loading. These suction cups cause deforms in the door panels if not placed on the most structurally sound areas of the door. For many owners, there is no option to strategically place the suction cups because of the alignment of the roof rack versus the door contours. It won’t take much damage to the door to outweigh the cost savings of this rack system.

              Second, once the kayak reaches the top of the Telos the loader is required to push the kayak onto the Downloaders. Since the Downloaders are J-style, the boat must fall into the carriers at an angle. This is not the tendency of the boat however, so you must possess a good deal of control, which is difficult for people at full extension. On smaller vehicles this may not be much of a problem, but if height is a concern a step ladder is required.

              Load Assist Racks

              Load assistance takes various forms, but they all essentially provide a surface for the kayak to be rested on during loading/unloading. The kayak only needs to be lifted one side at a time making the weight manageable for a single person loader. Additionally, they protect your paint job by allowing the kayak to rub on something other than the body panels of your car.
              The different types of load assistance are:
              1. Extendable arms
              2. Rollers

              Extendable Pole Load Assist

              Extendable pole load assists are less expensive options to loading a kayak. They are simple yet effective and provide decent protection to the vehicle. These poles attach to the roof rack crossbars and extend out from the side of the vehicle to support a single end of the kayak during the loading process. The purpose of these is to replace towels or floor mats being used to protect the paint job from the kayak. The simplicity of the part lends itself to all products reviewed being great options. There are few differences between the products and a buying decision for most will come down to crossbar compatibility.

              1. Yakima BoatLoader

              Yakima deliver again by providing a product that does exactly what it is intended to do. The Yakima BoatLoader extends 28” from the side of the vehicle and can handle the heaviest of kayaks. The cross bars is telescopic meaning it can slide into the Yakima circular cross bars and always be there when you need it. A frequent complaint about these style of loaders is the kayak slipping off the bar. Yakima answers this concern by using the largest stopper on the market.

              Another example of a simple design feature that can make or break the usability of this product. The downside I can find is that it is only compatible with Yakima round crossbars. If you have these you are in luck because this is the best extendable pole on the market.

              TL;DR: The Yakima BoatLoader serves its intended purpose perfectly. It has the best design of all products within it’s class. The only complaint I have is that it is only compatible with Yakima round crossbars.

              2. Thule 847 Outrigger

              The Thule 847 Outrigger Kayak Load Assist is very similar in design to the Yakima BoatLoader, however I feel the Boatloader design team executed slightly better on the stopper and sturdiness. The Outrigger II works only with square cross bars from Thule.The main differentiator for most buyers between the BoatLoader and Outrigger will be whether round or square cross bars are already installed on their vehicle.

              The Outrigger II extends 38” from the side of the vehicle and offers the same telescoping or sliding motion as the Yakima BoatLoader. 38” certainly adds more clearance from the vehicle, but can come with a dangerous side-effect if the load is not controlled. Dropping a kayak on the end of the Outrigger creates a spring board effect. This causes the boat to bounce and the undersized stopper is not sufficient to catch the load from falling. I feel the Outrigger should be made from stronger material to support it’s long span.

              TL;DR: Stronger material and a larger stopper are needed to support the poles 38” span. The product serves it’s purpose, but some practice is in order to avoid the spring board action.

              3. Rhino Rack Universal Side Loader

              The Rhino Rack Universal Side Loader represents this category’s leader in innovation. It sports a support beam under the stopper, which gives added strength and prevents the spring board effect. With the support beam, Rhino claims the system can handle loads up to 132lbs. and stretches 55” from the side of the vehicle. The bars are padded to prevent scratching and provide traction when the kayak is wet. And finally, there is a simple side loader with universal application. These are great solutions to the problems outlined with the Boatloader and Outrigger II, but there are always trade offs.

              Rhino makes up for not being able to slide into the cross bars when not in use by providing a “complimentary” heavy duty bag. Really this just means the side loader needs to be folded into a bag and stored in the car.
              The Rhino is more cumbersome to use since it is stored away. Set-up is required for every use, which will not take very long, but it could get annoying if you frequently kayak.

              TL;DR: The Rhino Rack Universal Side Loader offers solutions to many of the problems of traditional side load bars. The additional support bar, universal crossbar attachment, and extra padding are all worthy improvements that makes this one of the best options on the market. However, extra features always means extra cost so buy for your needs.

              4. INNO INA453 Rooftop Kayak Lifter

              The INNO INA453 Rooftop Kayak Lifter brings a new style of stow and go to the simple load assist genre. This model offers a swinging arm that can quickly be moved to and from the ready position. The arm extends 18” from the side of the vehicle making this the shortest of all the simple loaders. While this does well to negate spring boarding, it means the kayak will be in very close contact to the paint. I recommend using a towel or yoga mat in conjunction with the Inno. Simple assist loaders were created to replace the towel and slide method so I find other products do a better job as far as loading goes.

              The Inno has universal cross bar attaching capability. Any cross bar system with a spread of 27-39” will work for this system. The swing arm can handle up to 90lbs. which is more than enough to support even heavier fishing kayaks. Usually more cost is justified through more features, but this does not seem to be the case. The Inno is priced alongside the Rhino Rack Universal Side Loader, which has the capability to handle much heavier loads and extends 55” or triple the Inno’s span.

              The perk is in the ease of use associated with the swing arm and the ability to keep the loader attached to the rack throughout transportation.
              Inno justifies it’s similar price tag to the Rhino Rack Universal Side Loader with its ease of use features. The swing arm and the ability to lock onto the cross bars during transit make the Inno much quicker to use.

              TL;DR: The Inno Rooftop Cargo Rack Kayak Lifter is a simple solution to problem of lifting a kayak single handedly. The universal cross bar adaptor and the swing arm make it one of the most convenient simple loaders on the market. The 18” swing arm span gives little clearance between the boat and paint so added protection is needed during loading.

              5. Malone Seawing/Stinger Combo Load Assist

              The Malone SeaWing/Stinger Combo offers a simple load assist option for the rear of the car. Rear assist loading is only good for hatchbacks or SUVs and for the Stinger, only good for square trunks/tailgates with no spoiler. The Stinger itself extends onto the top of the tailgate and rests on the frame of the tailgate just above the windshield in most cases. Like most of the other kayak racks, you lean the kayak on the Stinger and move to the bottom of the kayak to hoist it onto the Seawings. The problem arise at this point. The stinger will not extend beyond rounded tailgates and will rub the vehicle.

              The second issue I found with the Malone Stinger is related to the stability of the Stinger at the extended position and the kayak groove on the end. The groove is very narrow and will not properly hold flat bottom or rounded kayaks. Drops are frequent for owners with these types of kayaks. The stability comes to play once the kayak has been lifted off the ground because the Stinger suffers from the spring board effect. Mixing insufficient cradling with the play of the Stinger can result in drops and damage.

              The Stinger/Seawing combo is a decent solution if both your kayak and vehicle avoid the issues mentioned above. For a system like this it is inexpensive compared to other models and it does allow for a single person to be able to load/unload the kayaks. The product holds up well to the test of time and is very simple to install.

              All of the issue with this rack load assist derive from the design of the Stinger. The Seawings are very well made and wide, V-shape accommodates most kayaks. Overall the combo’s cons far outweigh its price tag. The Seawings are well executed but the Stinger brings just too many risks to the table. The purchase price savings between this rack and its competitors will be negated after a single dent in your vehicle.

              TL;DR: The Stinger/Seawing combo should be sold separately and by that I mean the Seawings should only be sold. The Stinger makes single person loading possible, but not safe. There are better options on the market currently.

              Roller Load Assist

              Rollers can take on a couple different forms, but they all fundamentally act like a rolling pin to ease the transition from top of roof to the ground. There are more complex systems like the Whispbar and SlipStream that integrate rollers and carriers to more basic roller accessories that stick to the glass or body panels. The later will be bought separately from kayak carriers. Most permanent carriers are lined with rubber to grip and hold the kayak during transportation. Of course, this is counterproductive when trying to slid the kayak in and out of the carriers during loading. A good roller shines during this transitional phase by separating the kayak and rubber grip.

              1. Whispbar WB401 Saddle Roller

              Often times you can tell the parents of a child by their features. For the Whispbar WB401 Saddle Roller, its parents were a world class engineer and legendary artist because it is both beautifully designed and as functional as it gets.
              This is a premium kayak carrier worth every penny in my opinion. The Whispbar can be attached to the crossbars extremely quickly and easily. It is so quick and easy there is almost no reason to take them off after each use. Now if you do not want to take them off, there is a built-in locking system. I enjoy the peace of mind from knowing my carrier will not be stolen over night.

              The wings of each pad have four locking positions to conform to the bottom of the kayak. It is doubtful these setting will conform exactly to your needs, but it will still provide enough support to hold the kayak from moving. There are a total of four rollers on the Whispbar, 3 in the back and one up front. The three rollers in the back help the lifting process while you hold the majority of the weight and the single roller up top serves as a guide for the nose of the boat. Other horizontal holders make loading difficult because the kayak sticks to the rubbery grips.

              TL;DR: Located at the intersection of functionality and design, the Whispbar Kayak Roller Saddles are the best on the market. Worth every penny, if you have enough of them.

              2. Yakima ShowBoat Load Assist

              The Yakima ShowBoat Load Assist is more of an accessory than a complete unit like the Whispbar Roller or Thule SlipStream. The ShowBoat will need to be purchased with a pair of Yakima DeckHands or HullHounds. A common pairing will be with a set of HandRolls but that is more rolling than is necessary.

              The ShowBoat is an extendable bar that slides out over the back of the vehicle. It makes it possible to load kayaks with by yourself on an SUV or taller vehicle. It works best with vehicles with a square tailgate because rounded, station-wagon-shaped tailgates need additional clearance.
              Weight and clearance are two things you need to be aware of before purchasing this unit. The further the ShowBoat needs to be extended the less weight it can bear. This recipe means kayaks in the 70+ lbs range would be better suited with other load assist options.

              Apart from these issues I believe this a great solution for tall vehicle and moderate kayak weight combinations. The bar’s wide, smooth roller makes it compatible with all kayaks. It truly does turn a two man job into a single person endeavor.

              TL;DR: Not a great solution for heavy kayaks (70+ lbs.) because you lose extension at heavier weights. Otherwise, a fine product that makes loading kayaks significantly easier.

              3. Thule SlipStream

              The Thule SlipStream hits the market with the only complete roller assistance kayak rack. The rack has an extendable roller that stretches beyond the rear of the vehicle for single person loading. Once the kayak clears the roller, there are two sets of pads to hold the kayak during transit. The rear pads are felt lined for smooth sliding, while the front pads have rubber for extra grip. All four pads are pivots so they effortlessly conform to almost any kayak shape.

              The chief complaint with the SlipStream resides in the stiffness of the extendable roller. The roller can be very difficult to slide out and may require considerable yanking if the height is an issue. White Lithium spray will solve this problem for the most part.Make sure to call Thule for car fit on this model. Honda CR-V’s for example are susceptible to damage on the tailgates lights when the tailgate is fully open.

              The price tag will be a large deterrent for many as this systems is the most expensive roller by a large margin. You will get a well made product, but the price point is simply too high. If you are considering a rack in this price range I think you are better suited with Yakima Showdown as the roller is gimmicky in my opinion and offers little advantage over an extendable bar lift assist.

              SlipStream Thule Boat Roller Rack

              TL;DR: The SlipStream’s price point is the major issue with this model. The roller assist adds little utility to the contraption and at the price point, there are superior options.

              4. Seattle Sports Sherkpak Boat Roller

              Seattle Sports improved upon the lack luster design of the Malone K-Rack, but still left much to be desired. The improvement resides with the roller, which does an adequate job of assisting in the loading process. The Seattle Sports Sherpak Boat Roller fails with the suction cup design. The suction cups are difficult to attach to the vehicle if there is not a flat, clean surface. This piece is fairly priced, but remember you get what you pay for.

              TL;DR: Suction cups as an attachment point to the vehicle ruin this model. Although the price point is very low, this loader is still more hassle than it is worth.

              5. Malone K-Rack Load Assist Module

              Frankly, the Malone K-Rack Load Assist Module needs work. The entire design needs to be revisited because I cannot find a positive things about this contraption. The suction cups are difficult to get to adhere to the vehicle. The area where the kayak is suppose to slide into is too narrow for all but the smallest kayaks. In theory, this product is excellent. In practice, it simply will not work for most users.

              TLDR; You would be better suited using a pair of old towels because you will probably end up using them anyway.

              Permanent Kayak Carriers

              Permanent carriers are called so because they can withstand the elements for long periods of time. They do not have to be removed after each use, but many can be removed with minimal or no tools. They are constructed from metal and use foam padding to prevent oil canning. Permanent carriers provide no lift or load assistance, but are often used in conjunction with them. There are three types of permanent carriers, which each possess their own strengths and weaknesses.
              1. J-Style
              2. Stackers
              3. Saddles
              J-Style (Diagonal)
              These carriers look like a hook and hold the kayak at about a 45 degree angle. J-Style carriers are amongst the most popular carriers because they are a nice compromise between maximizing roof space and load security/protection. Since J carriers hold the load at angle, it allows even smaller vehicles to hold two kayaks. The angle also reduces the impact of wind drag on the kayak, which mitigates oil canning and fuel efficiency loss. Let it be known that J-style carriers are the most difficult to load so these are usually reserved for shorter vehicles or tall vehicle plus a step ladder.
              There are two types of J Style carriers:
              1. Foldable - The carriers can fold in half to increase clearance when not in use. This helps with leaving the carriers on for long periods of time or the length of a vacation. Foldable carriers can also hold two kayaks. The carrier can be adjusted to a vertical position so a kayak can be held on either side of the unit. One supported by the hook of the J and the other rests on the crossbars like a stacker.
              2. Rigid - Strong and inflexible does have its perks. Rigid carrier are typically constructed from a single piece of metal tubing coated with pads to protect the boat. There are fewer points of failure so this genre lasts longer than foldable units. Additionally, they are considerably cheaper because of the simple design. A good choice for those on a budget.
              Stackers (Vertical)
              Vertical carriers afford kayakers the ability to carry from 1-4 kayaks with a single rack. Stackers are strong towers that serve as a tie down point for kayak straps and use the crossbars to support the bottom of the kayaks. The lack of cushioning makes oil canning a concern and crossbars can become slick with moisture so kayaks need to be securely strapped down. This option is best for small and tough kayaks essentially whitewater kayaks or cheap play kayaks.
              Stackers are notorious for being hard to load single handedly because you must first balance all kayaks on their sides then strap them in. Unsurprisingly, kayaks are not very stable on their sides and tend to fall over. I recommend getting cradles to go on the crossbars to drastically simplify the loading process and stop oil canning.
              Saddles and Four Piece Sets (Horizontal)
              Horizontal carriers are the most secure option available for kayak roof racks. They typically only allow room for one kayak per roof, but there are some that can carry two. Kayaks can be transported on either the hull or upside down to help stay in the slipstream of the car. Loading is fairly straightforward, but some people find rollers to be a nice accessory for this category. In this field there are two main types of carriers “V” design saddles and four piece set saddles.
              Your “V” design saddles accommodate a wide range of kayaks and require little adjustment between kayaks. They are very easy to load. 
              Four piece set saddles are made up of 4 individual pieces usually with pivoting heads to conform to the kayak shape. They can be a pain to setup, but allow for a custom fit to your kayak. Once dialed in, these saddles are a great safe,solution to single kayak transportation. 

              J-Style Foldable Carriers

              1. Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle

              Whispbar strikes again with a wonderfully designed and impressively sleek Whispbar WB400 J-Cradle. I love the look of Whispbar products, and this J-cradle is not exception. This unit features a foldable upright arm, which locks at both the upright and down positions. A focal point of foldable arms is always the folding joint because it is a big point of failure on some other systems. The 10 lb solid construction eliminated doubts of the folding joint not being sturdy enough to handle heavy loads.

              All Whispbars features QuickDock technology, which allows the user to quickly attach the cradles to the crossbars without any tools. We are talking under one minute installation so easy it is hard to justify leaving them on overnight. However if you do, a built-in locking feature will ensure there is no chance of theft.

              My favorite feature is the extendable load assist arms. These stick about two feet out from the side of the rack to assist the loader getting the kayak to appropriate height and angle to fit into the J-cradles.
              I am very impressed with the design and utility of this J-cradle. Whispbar created a feature packed J-cradle without detriment to its appearance or functionality. It may be pricey, but its value outweighs the cost in my eyes.

              TL;DR: A J-cradle that has it all and looks good doing it. Simply put, the best J-cradle on the market.

              2. Rhino Rack Folding J Style Kayak Carrier S512

              The RRhino Rack Folding J Style Kayak Carrier S512 is tough like it namesake suggests. Rhino manufactures racks with the highest weight capability, which makes them perfect for the J style carrier category. One of the chief dangers of a J style rack is catching cross winds at interstate speeds which can break J carriers leading to all sorts of problems. Since most kayaks only weigh roughly 60-80lbs, this unit has the strength to get the job done.

              My favorite aspect of the Rhino is the paddle holder. This is the only carrier that offers this feature, and it is a nice alternative to storing kayak paddles inside the vehicle after a long trip.
              The carrier requires no tools to attach the the crossbars and is universal so it should mount to most types of crossbars.

              TL;DR: My top pick for J style carriers because of its durability and functionality. This kayak rack is strong enough to get the job done without worry, yet flexible enough to not require extensive setup and tear down time.

              3. Thule 835PRO Hullaport Pro

              Thule’s premium J style carrier is the 835PRO Hullaport Pro. You get what you pay for this model, which is a well made rig with everything you need together. This J style carrier folds down when not in use providing extra clearance for entry ways like garages. The Hull-a-Port sports all season pads that deter oil canning and greatly reduce noise during transport.

              Thule’s famous blue and yellow straps come with this unit like all Thule products. I am bag fan of the straps because they well made and have the Goldilocks length (not too long, not too short). They come with a rubber buckle protector to prevent metal rubbing against the kayak and reduce noise. Additionally the Hull-a-Port has a convenient velcro flap to store excess strap slack.

              TL;DR: A typical Thule product. If you want a set it and forget unit, this is the one you should go for because it will do everything you need.

              4. Yakima JayLow Folding J-Cradle

              The Yakima JayLow brings up the rear when considering folding J style racks. This product falls well below the average Yakima quality level in my opinion. Yakima products are built with the user in mind without breaking the bank, but not in this case.

              My first issue lies with the overall sturdiness of the Jaylow. It feels much more flimsy than either the Hull-a-Port or Rhino Rack. With a singe light kayak, it should be just fine, but adding two kayaks or a single large one may be a cause for concern.

              Secondly, the Yakima Jaylow whistles when it is folded down. Screw holes catch when in the folded position producing a light irritating whistling noise over speeds of 40mph. Electric tape over these screw holes will mostly solve the problem, but why not just buy one of the other racks?

              Lastly, the straps and bow/stern ties downs are cheap. The plastic on the end to protect the paint breakdown after a couple of uses. Also the S hooks will bend if the tie downs are every actually needed. You would be better off using a metal carabiner in its place. Since none of these are fatal flaws, I would consider this rack as a budget option if the price were cheaper.

              TL;DR: There are better options for the money. This product is well below Yakima’s typical quality level and should be avoided.

              J-Style Rigid Carriers

              1. ROLA 59912 J Style Kayak Carrier

              ROLA hit the hammer on the nail with the ROLA 59912 J Style Kayak Carrier. It is in the sweet spot of price and value for J style carriers. Thule, Yakima, and Malone all make a product similar to this model, but at a much steeper price tag with minimal value add. The ROLA is sturdy and well made, with no concerns of longevity issues. Really the only thing I can find wrong are the lack luster straps. The bow/stern tie-downs are fine, but the straps that hold the kayak to the J carriers are not usable for most people. I recommend purchasing some after market straps like these DORSAL Tie Down Straps.

              TL;DR: Great value at the price. It comes with everything you need without the extra padding of premium brands. The straps will probably need replacing, but the price is so low you will still come out ahead.

              Stackers (Vertical)

              1. Thule 830 Stacker, Yakima BigStack, & Rhino Nautico Stack

              Something a little bit unique with this review; I am grouping all of these stackers together because they are all too similar to warrant their own reviews. They differ in appearance more than anything and to select one is to select the whole group.

              The Thule 830 Stacker, Yakima BigStack, and Rhino-Rack S520 Nautic Stack stackers carry a hefty price tag, but with that comes all the perks of a big manufacturer. Clear installation instructions, quality straps, and longevity can all be expected from this group. Each stacker folds down to give additional clearance when not in use. The anchor point of the strap located at the top of the tower appear different but all operate equally.

              Stackers are difficult to load with one person and that is the main complaint from this group. None of the premium stackers address this issue, which is a bit disappointing considering there are others who do.

              TL;DR: Stackers are not complex racks and the perennial big brands did little to differentiate. These stackers are expensive, but will adequately serve your stacker needs.

              BONUS TIP: If you have the dough, purchase one of the big three with the Inno cradles to create an excellent stacker solution.

              2. Malone Stax Pro2

              The Malone Stax Pro2 may seem like it should be in the grouping with Yakima, Thule, and Rhino, but there are some glaring issues with this model. The StaxPro2 differs from the other grouping in the design of the folding mechanism. The joint of Malone’s folding mechanism relies on interlocking plastic teeth to hold the stacker in the upright position. This weak design can lead some units to fold in transit resulting in all sorts of dangerous situations. Other foldable stackers rely metal components to do the same job.

              Malone does address the pain of loading kayak stackers by providing foam cradles. The foam cradles nestle the kayak into a more secure position which makes unloading and loading much safer. I am glad to see an racking company come up with a solution to this issue, I just wish Malone did a better job of it. The foam cradles are simple blocks of foam with generic cuts to secure them to the crossbars. General fits rarely work and it won’t be long until these blocks fly away, but they are better than nothing.

              TL;DR: Malone had all the right ideas for a successful rack, but it just did not come to fruition. The main locking joint is susceptible to failure, making this rack to risky to recommend.

              3. Inno INA450 Dual Kayak Stacker

              Inno bounces on the scene with my favorite kayak stacker system on the market, the INNO INA450 Easy Mount Dual Kayak Carrier. Why you may ask? It is simple. This rack comes at a reasonable price, has no fatal flaws, and makes loading a stacker easy! That’s right, this stacker comes with two sets of clamp on cradles to hold the kayak up while you strap it in. The fix we all needed from stackers is upon us.
              Now back to the basics, this model is foldable with a high strength metal joint. In fact, the majority of the stacker is metal with a thick pad wrapped around the contact area.

              The INA450 is “universal” with all crossbars claims Inno. Lawyers were used in this description because it is universal only if you purchases the round bar adapters, which are sold separately. Square bars and most factory bars are in the clear though.

              Other than the round crossbar conundrum, this is the best stacker on the market in my opinion. However, if you do not trust Inno, a smart alternative could be to buy one of the stackers from the Group (Thule/Rhino/Yakima) and purchase the Inno cradles to go along with them. This is out of my price range personally, but it would be a winning combination.

              TL;DR: The Inno INA450 Dual Kayak Stacker is the best stacker on the market. It addresses the major concern with stackers by adding in a cradle at a very reasonable price. Top choice in the stacker category.

              Saddles (Horizontal)

              1. Malone SeaWing

              The Malone SeaWing is my top choice for simple horizontal kayak carrying needs. Now usually I am pretty hard on Malone (they deserve it), so this may come as a surprise.
              The SeaWing uses a “V” or some call it an “X” design to cradle the racks onto the roof top. This is the secret sauce that makes this the best carrier. Most other brands offer 4 small carriers, which I find to be troublesome installing and adjusting to the specific needs of each kayak. While the SeaWing will likely not fit your kayak perfectly, it will safely hold your kayak to the roof. The flexible design also means this model is compatible with nearly all types of kayaks. It even has a big brother the Malone MegaWing to accommodate kayaks up to 150 lbs.

              TL;DR: A true engineer's solution to horizontal kayak roof racks. The Malone SeaWing has simple design, easy use, and quick install all at a very reasonable price.

              2. Thule Top Deck, DockGlide, and DockGrip/ Yakima EvenKeel, SweetRoll, DeckHand, HullyRoller,and HandRoll

              Dang it Kayamping.net, not another group review. Sorry folks another group review. The purpose of these is to show you that they were included in my analysis of all the kayak racks on the market. If I simply ignored them, like I wanted to, you may think I just left them off the list.

              Anyways, I group these together because they are all very similar. Each brand has a ton of names to differentiate the various heads. These Yakima and Thule sets are various styles of four individual head units. The two big brands hold most of the market share in kayak roof racks so there seems to be a bit of copycatting going on.

              That being said, the individual heads offer a level of customization that will give your kayak the safest ride of all options. People with high end kayaks prefer this method for that reason.
              Loading and unloading is not the easiest because the rubber grips tend to catch the kayak, but there are solutions like rollers or sprays. 
              My opinion is that the majority of people will prefer the convenience of a saddle over the 4 piece set, but each does have their place. 

              TL;DR: The price tag is hefty and loading can be a pain, but if you take the time to dial in the fit, these units offer the best ride for kayaks in the horizontal position.

              Temporary Kayak Carriers

              Need a solution for infrequent kayak haul around town? Look no further than foam blocks, soft-sided racks, or inflatable kayak racks. These entry-level kayak racks are great for those still trying to figure out if kayaking is right for them. Temporary carriers suit infrequent trips best and should be removed from the vehicle after each use.

              All temporary carriers run a strap through the door gap to secure the carrier to the roof of the vehicle. This only presents a problem when the weather is bad. The straps create the slightest opening at the top of the door, which opens the way for rain water to work its way into the interior of the car. For slight drizzle it is manageable, but heavier rainfall can force you to pull over. Wrapping a dishcloth around the strap near the doorframe will prevent the water from dripping on you but will not solve the problem. As mentioned before, temporary carriers are best for short trips on clear days.

              Foam Blocks

              Foam blocks are about as simple as it gets. They are effective for short distances and very inexpensive. Some people swear by them and don’t see a need for any other means of kayak hauling. These are best used if you drive a vehicle that you don’t mind getting some scratches or deforms. Loading can be tricky with a single person and overtightening can lead to deforms in your roof. Again, I think these are a great,cheap alternative for entry level kayakers with expendable vehicles. Anyone with a valuable kayak or expensive car will be better suited to invest a permanent rack set-up. Keep in mind that foam block rigs are designed for short distances. For long trips, budget stops to check the kayak and retighten the ratchet straps.
              All foam blocks are pretty much the same, but some of the better ones are listed below.

              1. Swiss Cargo Foam Block Carrier

              Like I said above, most foam block racks have very little difference from each other. The Swiss Cargo Foam Block Carrier is everything you need in one packgage to get started. It has decent quality to it, but an investment in new straps and tie downs wouldn't hurt. It is the best generic foam block setup available online.

              2. Roof Kayak Carrier Foam Blocks

              The Roof Kayak Carrier Foam Blocks is a good alternative to the Swiss Cargo Foam block set. The straps are not of great quality so use the money you save to invest in some quality ratchet straps that fit your specific needs.

              Soft-Sided Carriers

              Relatively new on the scene are soft sided roof carriers. A hybrid between inflatable and foam blocks, they provide better fit to your roof than foam blocks and have a longer life span than inflatables. Soft-sided roof racks are the king of flexibility, which is both their greatest strength and greatest weakness. A roof rack designed to accommodate stand-up paddle boards, canoes, small boats, surfboards, or, in other words, everything under the sun, will not be specific enough to properly support kayaks. The racks do not have any fittings or features specifically for kayaks. Again, these racks are extremely flexible so if you are a multi-sport athlete, these racks will be helpful to you.

              1. Yakima Easytop

              Yakima is a company known for their quality at a fair price and that is what they have provided with the Yakima Easytop. Of all the soft-sided kayak racks, this is the only one I would trust with my kayak. Yakima has experience with kayak carrying so even though this is not specifically created for kayaks, it has a weight bearing capacity of 80lbs and enough structure to handle the load. The straps are well done and feature double buckles for added security. The best feature about the straps are the rings along the length of the pads. The straps can be looped through the rings to adjust for various sides kayak widths.

              TL;DR: The Yakima Easy Top is the only soft-sided rack I would use for my own kayak racks. It offers convenience and flexibility, while maintaining enough rigidity for mid to lightweight kayaks.

              Inflatable Carriers

              For this category of temporary kayak racks, I want you to think about every air mattress you have ever owned. Air mattresses require time to inflate and deflate for each use, and they tend to have you sleeping on the ground by the end of the night. Also, I have never had an air mattress that would last more than a year. 

              All the same problems appear in inflatable kayaks racks, making them the worst solution for temporary kayak racks. This was a cool idea that just did not pan out in the real world. Some of the products serve their intended purpose, but I cannot find a convincing reason why you would choose these options over soft-sided or foam block solutions.

              1. Malone Handirack

              If you have to use an inflatable roof rack, then there is really only one I can recommend without totally cringe. The Malone HandiRack is the big brother to the HR20, and can carry up to 180 lbs. I would put get the Handiworld over the HR20 because there is some room for error if an air chamber deflates during transport. That being said, air chamber failure is a major problem with this model. Eventually it is going to happen and good luck guessing when that will be.
              I recommend placing towels or pads underneath the Handiworld during use. The lightweight pads cannot be tightened enough to prevent them from vibrating/flapping in the wind at moderate speeds. This vibrating puts a beating on roofs leading to scratches and scuff marks.

              Despite these flaws, the perk of the Handiworld is that it takes up virtually no space once deflated. It can be easily stored in the car at all times, which makes it “Handi” in a bind.

              TL;DR: Inflatables are simply not the best solution for temporary kayak carriers. If you have to have one, use the Handiworld and modify it with pads or towels on the roof. Small deflation size means you can bring it with you all the time, but it will be rare when you unexpectedly need a kayak rack.

              Conclusion

              If you are an experienced kayaker with a $3000 boat or a college freshman with your first boat, there is a kayak system right for you. There is no best option because each person has their own needs in a unique situation. We have reviewed the most basic kayak racks, foam blocks to highly sophisticated hydraulic lift systems. No two people will have the same needs or wants, but that shouldn’t stop you from checking them all out.

              Hopefully, this guide will assist you in making the best buying decision for your kayaking adventures. To date it is the most comprehensive review of all kayak racks, but you must be the ultimate judge. Now hurry up and get to the water, there’s a huge world out there.