Hammock Bug Net protecting camper from insect while reading book.

Best Hammock Bug Net Review : Sleep Tight, No Bites

In Gear by Tanner V.

Value Pick

Nature's Hangout Bug Net


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Premium Pick

Kammok Dragonfly


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 Best Choice

ENO Guadian DX

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About the Author
Hi Everyone! My name is Tanner, and I am the founder of kayamping.net. I started this website as an outlet to pursue my hobby of kayaking, camping, and exploring the world at large. Every post here is written and curated by me so stop-in, have a read, leave a comment, and most importantly, get going on your next adventure!

You can get through life without a lot of things, but sleep just isn't one of them. There are thousands of hungry, disease-carrying insects eyeing the floating meat taco also known as your hammock each night you spend in the woods.

Protect yourself from these vermin by adding a hammock bug net to your pack. Don't spend a night in eternal misery by forgetting your hammock bug net on your next camping trip.

We have spent roughly 39 hours scouring the market for the best products. We studied 16 different bug nets and multiple DIY options to distill the best bug nets for you. However, we can always improve so be sure to share your thoughts on our post in the comments!

Comparison at a Glance

Product
Nature's Hangout Bug Net
ENO Guardian DX
Kammok Dragonfly
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Nature's Hangout Hammock Bug & Mosquito Net - 360 Degrees of Portable Insect Protection for Backpacking & Camping. Netting Fits Nearly All Outdoor Double & Single Hammocks
ENO - Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian DX Bug Net for Hammocks, Charcoal
Kammok Dragonfly (Mosquito Net)
Overall Rating
Value
Protection
Breathability
Weight Rating
Features
Stuff Sack Size
5.75in x 7.5in
7in x 4in
4.5in x 7.5in
Net Dimensions
10ft x 4.5ft
9.3ft x 2.5ft x 3.5ft
10.5ft x 4.25ft
Weight
14.4oz
13oz
10oz
Color(s)
Black
Charcoal
Grey
Product
Nature's Hangout Bug Net
Image
Nature's Hangout Hammock Bug & Mosquito Net - 360 Degrees of Portable Insect Protection for Backpacking & Camping. Netting Fits Nearly All Outdoor Double & Single Hammocks
Overall Rating
Value
Protection
Breathability
Weight Rating
Features
Stuff Sack Size
5.75in x 7.5in
Net Dimensions
10ft x 4.5ft
Weight
14.4oz
Color(s)
Black
Product
ENO Guardian DX
Image
ENO - Eagles Nest Outfitters Guardian DX Bug Net for Hammocks, Charcoal
Overall Rating
Value
Protection
Breathability
Weight Rating
Features
Stuff Sack Size
7in x 4in
Net Dimensions
9.3ft x 2.5ft x 3.5ft
Weight
13oz
Color(s)
Charcoal
Product
Kammok Dragonfly
Image
Kammok Dragonfly (Mosquito Net)
Overall Rating
Value
Protection
Breathability
Weight Rating
Features
Stuff Sack Size
4.5in x 7.5in
Net Dimensions
10.5ft x 4.25ft
Weight
10oz
Color(s)
Grey

Related Reading: Kammok vs Eno Review


Editor's Pick

ENO Guardian DX

  • Two Doors Entry/Exit
  • Spreader Bar
  • Large Internal Pockets
  • Best for Single Hammock

The ENO Guardian DX is our choice for the best premium hammock bug net because it represents high quality materials with innovative features. It is the only bug net on the market to sport two vertical zippered doors for easy access and ventilation.

An internal spreader bar separates the sides of the net to give a spacious interior and keeps the bugs far away from you. Unlike other bug nets, the spreader bar does removes the need for a ridgeline meaning you have an uninterrupted view of the night’s sky. Both ends of the bug net have large ceiling pockets, perfect for lightweight objects such as glasses.

To hang lights or a lantern, ENO included internal gear loops to remove the need of fumbling around for your flashlight in the middle of the night. In summary, the Guardian DX by ENO strikes a great balance between comfort, size, and weight, which makes it perfect for camping, hiking, or backpacking.


Best Premium Bug Net

Kammok Dragonfly

  • Feather Weight
See on Amazon
  • 9.8 Oz.
  • Knotless Adjustable Ridgeline
  • High Breathability
    For those who count every ounce, the Kammok Dragonfly bug net is the lightest on the market. To get under 10 ounces, you might think Kammok butchered features found in it’s competitors, but you would be mistaken. The Dragonfly offers an easy knotless setup, double zipper horizontal entry, a reflective paracord, and a roll top water resistant pack.
    It's differentiator is the trademark Dragonet 15D no-see-um nylon netting.
    Due to this technology, the Dragonfly provides complete 360 degree insect protection while not sacrificing breathability or strength.


    Best for the Money

    Nature’s Hangout Bug Net

    • Budget Pick
      See on Amazon
      • Double Hammock Capable
      • Double Zipper Horizontal Entry/Exit
      • Roll-Top Waterproof Stuff Sack
      • 14.4 Oz. Weight
      • Large Stuff Sack

      For kayampers on a budget, it is my pleasure to introduce the Nature’s Hangout bug net. At half the price of the premium bug nets, its a wonder Nature’s Hangout is able to include so many features and still turn a profit.

      The expansive net is large enough to cover all but the largest double hammocks for a full 360 degrees. Sturdy component parts like the double horizontal zipper and 32 ft. reflective ridgeline with adjusters mean this is a bug net you can count on to last.

      The unique double buckle roll-top stuff sack compresses the large netting to make it backpack friendly and totally waterproof. All things considered the NHO bug net is the perfect starter bug net.

      Related Reading: ENO Rain Fly's Review


      Feature Analysis


      Netting Construction

      To determine the quality of a bug net construction you must consider:

      1. Material used
        1. Cotton
        2. Polyamide (nylon)
        3. Polyester (tarylene)
      2. Tightness of the weave
        1. Standard Mesh - Greater than 1.2 millimeters
        2. No-See-Um Mesh - 0.6 millimeters or smaller

      We will dive into each of these in the sections below to determine what you should consider when buying.

      Netting Material: Cotton vs. Synthetics

      Most mosquito nettings found today will be made from cotton, nylon, or tarylene.

      The best hammock bug nets use no-see-um mesh to deter even the smallest insects.The oldest material of the three, cotton, has recently given way to nylon and tarylene as the most common net material. On a microscopic scale Cotton is naturally very "hairy". These random strings add extra obstacles to bug trying to enter the net. The downside is that cotton is easy to tear and degrades over time like your favorite undershirt. For this reason cotton is not popular for hammock bug nets that need to be packed and repacked every day.

      Nylon and Tarylene are synthetic materials with high cut resistance that last for years. Modern day hammock bug nets should be made from these materials as they are the strongest, lightweight, quick-drying, and mildew resistant.

      The two differ synthetics are very similar in nature and use. You probably have clothing made from both materials on you right now!

      Weave Size: Standard Mesh vs. No-See-Um

      When choosing mesh sizes you have to make a decision between protection and breathability. The smaller holes found in no-see-um netting will stop all bugs but will also trap in warm air. The opposite is true for standard mesh.

      Standard netting is categorized as having holes larger than 1.2 millimeters. This will stop all but the smallest blood suckers like no-see-ums and midges. No-see-um netting defined as 0.6 millimeters or smaller holes will stop every bug in the forest.

      Hammock bug net no-see-um material

      Net Color

      Color options for stuff sacks are plentiful but limited for the actual netting. The most popular net colors are white, grey, and black. The best option of the three is grey for two reasons:

      1. Lighter color material reflects heat AKA no black
      2. White netting is easier to see at night. Black netting is easier to see during the day. Grey is the perfect compromise.
      The impact of the netting color will be minimal, all things considered. It is more important to focus net size and functionality.

      Coverage: Net Size Matters

      Hammock bug nets are designed to keep the bugs off of you. In order to do this, the bug net must totally encompass your hammock on all sides and be spacious enough that your body is not resting against the net.
      Mosquitos can bite through your hammock, shirt, and bug net. The bug net can only stop them from entering the net but cannot stop their beaks. Proper sizing of the bug net is critical to a good night's sleep.
      The key is to make sure the bug net will fit your hammock at it’s most stretched position.
      A larger sized bug net will add ounces to your pack so you must choose one that is right for you. That said, we recommend at least a 9 ft. by 5 ft. bug net for the average hammock sleeper. 10 ft. by 6 ft. would be more than enough for larger campers or sleeping two to a hammock.
      Bug Net Size Recommendations 
      Length
      Height
      Single Sleeper
      9 ft.
      4 ft.
      Double Sleeper
      11 ft.
      5 ft.

      Stuff Sack

      Almost all bug nets store in a stuff sack for transportation. These bags are very similar to the stuff sacks hammock manufacturers like ENO use for compression. That being said, not all stuff sacks are created equal. Some come with waterproofing features and roll-top closures. Stuff sack size largely comes down to the overall size of the net.

      Kayak campers will be affected by waterproofing features and the overall size of the stuff sack, while weight may not be much of a concern. Backpackers need size and weight to be reduced so DIY options may be best. Other campers can largely ignore this information and choose the bug net that best fits their needs.

      Length
      Width
      Height
      Biggest
      15 in.
      10 in.
      18 in.
      Smallest
      6 in.
      6 in.
      6 in.
      Average
      7 in.
      6 in.
      9 in.

      Weight

      There is a bit of a sport to seeing who can get the lightest pack and still camp comfortably these days as some consider a bug net to be a luxury item (not us!), you should aim to minimize its impact on your pack. The vast majority of bug nets are under 24oz. with the average hovering around 16oz. (1 lbs.). The lightest bug net on the market is 9.8oz.

      Value

      Bug nets range from $30 to $125 with varying ranges of quality. Cheaper bug nets will include thicker netting with low breathability, weak seams, and plastic zippers destined for jams. Higher quality products will have solutions for its cheaper competitors’ flaws and come with accessories like carabiners, compression bags. Price is not always indicative of quality, but the two are usually closely related.

      Horizontal vs. Vertical Entry/Exits

      The only way out of bug nets are from zippered openings that either zip from ground to sky (vertical) or head to toe (horizontal). In truth vertical or horizontal openings comes down to personal preference. With that being said, horizontal openings are only good if there are two zippers per seam. This will allow you to open the bug net from either side of the hammock and won’t restrict your sleeping orientation.
      If you don’t like zippers at all, check out our DIY section for shock cord or top entry hammock designs.

      The DIY


      Necessity is the mother of creation. The DIY community never fails to produce innovative solutions the big corporations seem to miss. For those unafraid of busting out a sewing machine, the world is your oyster when it comes to hammock bug nets. While there is endless DIY options out there, we highlight some of the top setups for you to peruse.

      How to Make a DIY Hammock Bug Net

      The Ultra Minimalist DIY

      So what if none of these pre-fabbed bug nets are right for you? Whether you consider yourself a DIYer or not, creating a homemade bug net is not as difficult as you might think. The simplest DIY solution is to buy a lace sheet from Wal-Mart and drape it over yourself throughout the night. This requires no sewing and only about $10.

      Simple and effective, but not without drawbacks. The bug net will be laying directly on your body which causes a couple problems. First off bug can still land on the bug net and sting you through the lacing. The countermeasure is to double or triple fold the lace to give you some "breathing room" - well not really. You have essentially added another blanket to your hammock so prepare accordingly. The second issue lays in the fact that anything not covered by the lace will be bitten.. including your face. You must have the fabric laying on your face all night. DIYers have countered this by wearing a forward facing ball cap but it won't negate breathing onto your own face all night.

      The Tube/Sock Style DIY

      If you have some sewing skills, you can increase the luxury by sewing the large lace sheet into a cylinder, sew a channel for a the guyline, and use rope to secure the ends once inside. This rig is very similar to most of the manufactured options but without zippers, gear loops, etc..

      A sewing machine is required for constructing the the guyline channel. If you do not have one, we recommend checking with family or your local tailor. The sewing can be completed very quickly ~10 minutes. This is the DIY bug net solution we most recommend for the average Joe.

      To enter or exit this bug net you slide the bug net on or off you similar to drawing a curtain. This method presents some challenges when you are in the hammock so others have designed bottom entry and top entry version.

      Bottom entry nets hang loose below the hammock and are tightened by pull cords.

      Top entry bug nets rely on extra material folding over the opening.

      What is the Best Bug Net for Eno Hammock?

      Eno hammocks are far and away the most popular hammock so many of you will find yourself asking this question. The short answer is the bug net from our list at the beginning of this article that best suits your needs. You don't need to pair an ENO hammock with an ENO bug net. Determine your needs, make sure the bug net is large enough to cover the hammock, and pull the trigger.